“Society is evolving. We, all of us, must keep up. Because those who do not, will be left behind. So when you read that Shell has bought a utility company, when you hear what we are doing in electric vehicle charging, in renewables or hydrogen – that is where we are coming from. Shell is seeking to make sustainable investment in a sustainable future.” 

Ben van Beurden

“Climate change is the biggest challenge facing the energy industry, but the energy industry is not the biggest challenge for a world trying to tackle climate change. That task is far bigger than any one industry, any single country, or even continent.”

Ben van Beurden

 “Selling a mix of energy products with a progressively lower carbon intensity is exactly what Shell aims to do. That will mean more low-carbon biofuels in the mix of things we sell, more renewable electricity and products like hydrogen too. It also means addressing our operational emissions, including methane leaks.”

Ben van Beurden

Ben van Beurden
Ben van Beurden

“We can choose to sell lower-carbon products, but we cannot make people buy them.”

Ben van Beurden

“Reducing emissions to net zero – lowering them to the point at which the world is no longer adding to the stock of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere – is the only way to go.”

Ben van Beurden

“The world is not moving fast enough to tackle climate change. But I believe that action taken by business, working together, has the potential to help change that. That is why Shell wants to help establish a coalition of businesses which work together, within sectors, to enable decarbonisation of those sectors.”

Ben van Beurden

 “The use of energy products, like oil and gas and coal – for power, heating, cooling, industry, transport – causes the majority of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. So changing the mix of energy products in the energy system is essential to address climate change. But any attempt to address climate change on those grounds alone will not succeed. Because changing the energy system, is not just a question of supply, but of demand too.”

Ben van Beurden

Jessica Uhl
Jessica Uhl

“Shell has an ambition to cut the net carbon intensity of the energy products we sell by around 50% by 2050. This is a rate of reduction consistent with the global goals of Paris. It is what we call our Net Carbon Footprint ambition. But Shell can only sell what people and companies are willing to buy. We will only succeed in moving fast enough to meet Paris if our customers move at that pace too. So the work to achieve our ambition to change the mix of our energy products does not – and cannot – end there. Shell must do what we can to help society make fast progress. We – and other energy supply companies – cannot control demand for that energy. But what we can do is work with energy use sectors to optimise the decarbonisation of that demand.”

Ben van Beurden

“I hope we can all agree that a way must be found to ensure the developing world has the energy on which to build a better future, free of poverty, even as work continues to enable Paris.”

Ben van Beurden

“There is the pressing challenge of moving to a cleaner energy system to meet growing energy demand while tackling climate change. People can have a hard time trusting us as an oil and gas company to do the right thing… when it comes to our stakeholders, society and climate change. Showing who we really are and what we really do, I believe is one of the best ways people can understand the many contributions we make to society and understand the efforts we are making to try and serve the needs of shareholders, stakeholders, society, as well as the environment. Not because we think it will necessarily make people like us. But because we want to enable people to make their own decisions, based on the right information, on whether they can trust us. To see us not how they imagine us, but as we really are.”

Jessica Uhl

Maarten Wetselaar
Maarten Wetselaar

“Electric cars, biofuels and hydrogen all have great potential. But it will take time before they can gain enough of a share of the market to substantially reduce emissions from transport. Time the world, quite frankly, does not have. Recently the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change outlined the need for an ever more rapid transition to a lower-carbon world. Carbon dioxide emissions need to fall sharply. Not starting in 2040, when there could be 280 million electric cars on the road, but from 2020. Next year. So yes, I believe it is right to invest in cleaner fuels that can start to have a positive impact on reducing emissions in the 2020s or 2030s. But we must also focus on the transport fuels that nearly all of the 7.5 billion people on earth use today. Fuel makers, car-makers, policy-makers… we should all continue to improve the efficiency of internal combustion engines.”

Maarten Wetselaar

“Another way to improve the use of traditional fuels is to store or offset the emitted CO2. Shell helps with the development of techniques to capture and store CO2 away safely and will increasingly look for solutions in the natural world to reduce the concentration of greenhouse gas in the atmosphere.”

Maarten Wetselaar

“We are not about to see overnight change in transport, no matter how helpful that would be in terms of meeting the Paris Agreement. This does not mean we can lean back… on the contrary, we need to change urgently. But if we actually want to reduce emissions fast, we should not see the future of transport fuels as a fight with a clear winner, but as a partnership. I believe the future of transport will be shaped not by one, but by many solutions… some of them will be new, like electric batteries, and some will be traditional, like LNG, but they must all have one thing in common: they must all help to bring down the emission of greenhouse gasses and pollutants.”

Maarten Wetselaar

Harry Brekelmans
Harry Brekelmans

“Right now, humanity faces what is possibly one of the greatest challenges it has ever faced. The question is, how does the world meet a growing demand for energy, while seeking to move to a cleaner, lower-carbon energy system to tackle climate change and air pollution? We all have a responsibility to our societies and we must all play our parts. We, as an industry, need to provide more and cleaner energy.”

Harry Brekelmans

Meer Shell

Dossier: Klimaatzaak

Over één ding zijn we het allemaal eens: de wereld heeft een schoner energiesysteem nodig om klimaatverandering tegen te gaan. Over de wijze waarop de wereld dit moet doen, lopen de meningen uiteen. Lees in het Klimaatdossier hoe Shell werkt aan de energietransitie en wat Shell vindt van de aangespannen Klimaatzaak.

Wat doet Shell? Acht vragen over Shell en klimaatverandering

Het doel van de het Klimaatakkoord van Parijs is om de stijging van de wereldwijde temperatuurstijging gemiddeld ‘ruim onder’ de 2° C te houden, ten opzichte van pre-industriële niveaus. Shell wil haar rol spelen en bijdragen aan de mondiale inspanning om klimaatverandering aan te pakken.

De nieuwe energiekaart

Op weg naar schonere energie. Benieuwd wat Shell in uw buurt doet? Bekijk onze stappen in de Nederlands energietransitie.